Green Mountain National Park

In June 2005, Green Mountain was opened as the first National Park on the island: a proud moment for Ascension and a milestone in its conservation history. Green Mountain National Park, a site of great natural beauty, is home to a wide variety of the island’s wildlife including land crabs and 6 of Ascension’s 7 endemic plants, which are found nowhere else in the world. It also offers a great deal of historical interest, ranging from the Norfolk Island Pines, planted to provide timber for sailing ship masts, to the tunnel, dug in the 1830s to enable water to be pumped through the mountain. There has been continued work (largely funded by the Overseas Territories Environment Programme) to make this area accessible as a place for island residents and visitors to relax and appreciate the beauty of the island.

 

Stedson Stroud officially opening Green Mountain National Park: June 2005

 

The following leaflets provide information on the history, walks and nature on Green Mountain (paper copies also available from the Conservation Office:

 

Trails in Green Mountain National Park

 

The Administrator officially opening the new Elliotts Pass educational nature walk (more details here): March 2013

 

Endemic plant propagation

An important feature of the national park is its endemic plants (find more information about them here). There have been 10 species of endemic plants recorded on Ascension but unfortunately 3 are now extinct. All of the remaining 7 endemic plant species (5 of which are ferns and 2 are flowering plants) are currently on the IUCN’s Red List of Threatened Species after assessment in 2009. However efforts of the Conservation Team with support from partners (e.g. at Kew Gardens, the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology and the Natural History Museum) have seen these species successfully propagated and reintroduced into the wild where they continue to be monitored and appear to be doing well.

 

 

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